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Archive for February, 2015

NSS 2015 International Student Art Contest

Monday, February 23rd, 2015

Dustfall on Mars space art
Dustfall on Mars space art

The National Space Society is holding a student space art contest which is free to enter and is open to students aged 13-25 years old world-wide. The theme for this art contest is life in a space settlement. Submissions to the contest are to focus on the daily activities of living and working in a space settlement located somewhere in the solar system. A key rule for art being submitted to the contest is that it has to be a realistic depiction of human activities. That means no aliens, no faster-than-light UFOs, and no other violations of science. The contest is particularly interested in photo-realistic submissions.

The contest’s Grand Prize winner will have their artwork published on the cover of Ad Astra magazine as well as receiving a complimentary membership in the National Space Society and complimentary registration to the 2015 International Space Development Conference being held in Toronto, Canada.

In addition to the Grand Prize, First Prizes and Honorable Mentions may also be awarded depending on the artistic merit of the submitted entries. I must point out that the contest does contain a provision that if none of the art submitted adequately meets contest standards, then no prizes shall be awarded – which is reasonable given that unlike most other art contests there is no fee charged to submit art for this contest.

For my part, I will again be serving as one of the art judges for the contest. Here are some tips from me for students submitting art. First, if your artwork is set inside a space settlement then have a window in the scene so that the viewer can identify where in the solar system your settlement is. Second, since the art is to depict settlement life, make sure to have a person somewhere in your artwork. Third, if the subject of your art is an astronaut exploring or working on the surface of the Moon, Mars, or an asteroid, then make sure that you have some sort of habitat somewhere in your scene. For example, an astronaut exploring the surface of an asteroid with a settlement in the distance, either on the surface of the asteroid or in orbit above it. Lastly, be sure to get your science right. In one space art contest I judged, the artist had an astronaut in a spacesuit on the surface of the Moon standing next to a pool of water. No matter how good your art is, if you do something like that your art will not be a winning entry.

Submissions to this art contest are due by March 16. Students who are under age 18 must have their parents permission in order to participate.

Art Contest Reference Links

The Illustration

To illustrate this post I used some of my own space art. Dustfall on Mars is a piece I was commissioned to create for presentation to Mars Society President Robert Zubrin on his 65th birthday. Unlike much of my art, this piece is a straight forward example of painting digitally. The version shown here has been cropped.

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A Weekend of Art and Space at Capricon

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015

Capricon Science Fiction Convention
The Constellation Capricornus aka Capricorn, not Capricon

This weekend I’ll be attending the Capricon Science Fiction Convention which is being held at the Westin Chicago Northshore in Wheeling IL. I’ve attended quite a few Capricons over the years and have always had a good time. This year I’ll be pretty busy – giving one presentation and participating in five panels on art and space.

As a part of the convention, I’ll be giving my presentation Digital Art: Delights and Dilemmas in which I discuss the issues and challenges that digital artists face. I talk about hardware, platforms, software, storage, and accessories issues – not to mention that classic issue of "is it art?"

On the subject of art, I will be moderating the panel Great Artists of Science Fiction. The panel is described as follows:

Art has always been an integral part of science fiction. The decades have given us several masters – and today more artists than ever are producing amazing work. Who are the greatest artists of science fiction thus far? Who do we think will be on that list twenty years from now?

My co-panelists are Dexter Fabi, Alessandra Kelley, and Deb Kosiba. We are taking some liberties with the panel in that we will start out by discussing our favorite science fiction artists. So far our list of artists includes John Berkey, Chesley Bonestell, John Harris, Syd Mead, Frank R. Paul, Arthur Rackham, Albert Robida, Gene Szafran, and Michael Whelan.

Sticking with art, I will be participating in the Cover Snark panel whose description reads:

There have been some radiant, resplendent, and refined works of art gracing the covers of SF/F books. Then there are the ones we’re going to snark about today. Which covers make you ask “Whyyyyy?” Which covers might have been cool at the time but are now rubbishy?

For my part I’ve prepared a sequence of images that tracks the cover art used for Robert Heinlein’s Methuselah’s Children beginning with Leo Dillion’s illustration from 1958 and continuing through to a 2013 edition that simply used a NASA Hubble Space Telescope photograph for the cover art. Fortunately in researching the topic I came across an absolutely horrible example of cover art that really left me scratching my head. My fellow art critics on this bad art extravaganza are moderator Alessandra Kelley, Mallory Harrelson, Helen Montgomery, and Blake Packard.

Besides art, another favorite topic of mine is space exploration and development. On this subject I’ll be moderating the panel Re-starting the Manned Space Program. Joining me will be Chris Gerrib and Bill Higgins. Our mission: to explore what the next steps for human space exploration should be. We’ll be paying particular attention to the subject of new space and the potential for private/commercial space development to open the final frontier to the rest of us.

Looking a few years or decades down the road, another panel I will be moderating is A Lunar Life in which we explore what it would be like to be born, live, work, and retire on the Moon. My focus will be on commerce and the lunar economy because the Moon will never become a second home for humanity until such undertakings can pay their own way. Joining me will be Dale Cozort, Anne Elliot, Mark Huston, Jim Lund, Henry Spencer, and Dr. Michael Unger. With seven panelists, not only is this the largest panel I’ve ever been on, it’s the largest I’ve ever moderated! Will chaos and pandemonium reign?

Lastly, I’ll be a panelist on Rise Up! in which we’ll be talking about all things that fly (not counting birds). Moderated by Bill Higgins, my co-panelists are Emmy Jackson and Henry Spencer. If you want to hear about hot-air balloons, zeppelins, airplanes, jets, rockets, and space ships, then this is the panel for you.

The Illustration

The illustration above is a stylized rendition of a star map for the constellation Capricornus (not Capricon). Capricornus is Latin for "horned goat" and is generally represented as a sea-goat: a mythical creature with the fore body of a goat and the aft body of a fish. In a nod to this bizarre creature, the name of the Capricon convention’s newsletter is Goat Droppings.

See you at the con.

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Winning Entries in the NSS Enterprise in Space Orbiter Design Contest

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

Enterprise in Space Orbiter Design Contest Grand Prize Winner
Enterprise in Space Orbiter Design Contest Grand Prize Winner

I previously wrote about my role as orbiter design contest manager for the National Space Society Enterprise in Space Orbiter Design Contest in the posts Voting Open For Enterprise In Space Orbiter Design Contest and Enterprise Orbiter Design Contest.

The objective of Enterprise in Space is to design, build, launch, operate, and return to Earth a spaceship (satellite) that will host 100 student experiments. The spacecraft will remain in orbit approximately one week during which time the experiments are expected to complete their tasks. It really is a unique project. The biggest hurdle is funding as all the project costs will be covered via donations. This includes design costs, construction costs, experiment flight costs, launch costs, etc. Note that while student experiment flight costs are covered, the costs of the experiments themselves are not covered. Two ways in which I’ve contributed to the project to date have been by 1) accepting an invitation to join the Enterprise in Space Board of Advisors and 2) agreeing to serve on a volunteer basis as the orbiter design contest manager.

And now I can share the identity of the three winners of the orbiter design contest. It took two rounds of voting for we judges to identify three winning entries. Judging the contest were myself; Fred Becker (EIS Chief Engineer); Dominic DePasquale (CEO of Terminal Velocity Aerospace); Steve Neill (owner of SNG Studio); Andrew Probert (Consulting Senior Illustrator); Jon Ramer (President of the International Association of Astronomical Artists); and Tobias Richter (CEO of Light Works). We could have selected the three winning entries on the first ballot but the voting rules I established required that in order to win, each entry had to get 62% of the vote for that category: Grand Prize, First Prize, Second Prize. This extra hurdle helped to insure a consensus for each of the winning entries. Yes it meant more work and more discussion but as a consequence I’m confident that we selected the three best contest entries.

The contest’s Grand Prize winner is Stanley Von Medvey who by profession is a concept artist. Now I actually know Stanley and was grateful that he created a promotional video for the 2010 International Space Development Conference web site for which I was serving as webmaster. Sorry Stanley but because of this you did not get the Grand Prize vote from me even though I thought that your entry was the best design.

The First Prize winner is Steven Pestana, a senior at California State Polytechnic University and the Second Prize winner is John Cortes, a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania.

To see all the winning entries and to read the press release announcing the winners head on over to www.enterpriseinspace.org/winner/. You may also want to consider making a donation to support the project.

For my part, not only do I look forward to the day that I can witness the launch of the NSS Enterprise Orbiter, but I am also most curious to see what types of experiments the students of the world come up with.

Ad Astra, Jim

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