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Archive for October, 2015

Algorithmic Abstract Art Orientation

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015

Tunnel Vision Algorithmic Abstract Art
Tunnel Vision Algorithmic Abstract Art

Over the last several days I’ve created a number of new works of algorithmic art. One of these pieces is Tunnel Vision – shown above. After creating this particular artwork I began to wonder if the orientation I had used in its creation would actually be the orientation that other people would find to be the most aesthetically appealing. To get an idea of what that answer might be I posted the image below to several art groups and asked people to identify which of the four orientations they found to be the most aesthetically pleasing.

abstract algorithmic art orientation choices
The Four Artwork Orientation Choices

While early voting had A as the overwhelming preference, by the time voting was effectively over, D had emerged as a close runner up. With respect to the two portrait oriented choices, I find it easy to see why D was clearly preferred to C as that’s the choice that I find more aesthetically pleasing. With respect to the two landscape oriented choices, option A was clearly preferred over option B. Again I agree.

Abstract Art Orientation Survey Results
Abstract Art Orientation Survey Results

Taking a step back, you can see in the survey results that there is almost a 50-50 split between people selecting a landscape orientation versus a portrait orientation. So the real challenge is choosing between options A and D with the core question being does this artwork work better as a portrait-oriented artwork or as a landscape-oriented artwork? Given the symmetry of this piece, I think the answer to this question is really one of personal taste.

Creating Tunnel Vision

In creating Tunnel Vision, I was working with a program that is a descendant of a very simple spirograph program I had written for a class I taught on using Processing to create digital spirographs and harmonographs. The image below is an example of the type of output that original spirograph program created.

Original spirograph program output
Original spirograph program output

Over a period of time I gradually enhanced and expanded that program along several separate aesthetic lines of evolution. Tunnel Vision is the result of one of those evolutionary lines.

And My Aesthetic Vote Is…

When I created Tunnel Vision, I did so with the orientation of the canvas corresponding to option A. And it was with that landscape orientation in mind that I modified various parameters to create a work that satisfied my personal aesthetic. Fortunately for me the survey results served as a confirmation of the creative choices I had made.

Open Edition Prints

Open edition prints of Tunnel Vision are available from the following art print sites:

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Makers Faire Milwaukee, Charon Wallpaper, and Art Workflow

Saturday, October 10th, 2015

Inside Makers Faire Milwaukee
Inside Makers Faire Milwaukee

A couple weeks ago I attended Makers Faire Milwaukee. I had meant to do a write up of my experience but I’ve had a case of writer’s block in figuring out just what I wanted to say. I was at Makers Faire for two reasons. First, I was conducting a workshop on Creating Digital Spirographs and Harmonographs with Processing – a favorite of mine as it combines art with math with programming.

Second, wearing my NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Solar System Ambassador hat, I delivered a presentation on the New Horizons mission to Pluto. With respect to my Pluto talk, a number of the illustrations I use are either my own renders or my own interpretations of New Horizons imagery. For example, here is a free wallpaper version of my enhanced and colorized image of Charon that I’ve previously shared on social media.

Lastly I’ve been adding new fields to my art inventory spreadsheet that I hope to be able to use to help automate the production of gallery pages here on my web site. While I was at it, I decided to do a basic write-up of the data keeping portion of my art work flow. If this is of interest to you, then see My Art Workflow – The Management Bits.

With respect to my art, consider checking out my portfolios on the following art print on demand sites.

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