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Archive for April, 2016

Creative Coding Software Tools: Processing, openFrameworks, Cinder

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

Creative Coding Software Tools:
Creative Coding Software Tools: Processing, openFrameworks, Cinder

In my previous blog post, Fresh Brewed Coffee Digital Art, I made mention of the fact that I create my digital art using software of my own design and that for those digital artists interested in pursuing this aspect of digital art creation, there were some alternative tools available. In that post I mentioned Processing, openFrameworks, and Cinder. I would like to take this opportunity to say a little more about each of these three options.

Processing

Starting with Processing, this is a framework and programming language that is built on top of Java, an object-oriented programming language. Like Java, Processing is free and available on a variety of platforms. Personally I use Processing on both Windows 7 and Ubuntu Linux. Because the Processing programming language was created for artists and musicians with little or no programming background, beginners can quickly be up, running, and creating with this wonderfully flexible software tool. The flexibility of Processing as an environment for creative coding is expanded by the abundance of third party libraries that have been made available. It is also the most flexible tool in terms of the variety of platforms it works with. I have taken advantage of the ability to write Processing sketches for the web using the Javascript version of Processing (Processing.js) as well as for creating Android apps and for interacting with the Arduino (see The Arduino Starter Kit – Official Kit from Arduino with 170-page Arduino Projects Book). For those new to programming and creative coding, Processing is my number one recommendation.

Processing Resources

The main Processing web sites are:

Following are three books on Processing that I recommend and own. There are a number of other books on Processing that are also quite good. Please be aware that Processing is now on version 3 and version 2 is still widely used but do avoid any book that was written for version 1 of Processing.

openFrameworks

Like Processing, openFrameworks is also free and available on multiple platforms. In fact I even had the opportunity to write some openFrameworks programs on a Raspberry Pi (see CanaKit Raspberry Pi 3 Ultimate Starter Kit – 32 GB Edition) that was running the Raspbian operating system. The primary difference between Processing and openFrameworks is that whereas Processing is a framework that sits on top of the Java programming language, openFrameworks sits on top of the C++ programming language. Personally I find openFrameworks to be somewhat more challenging than Processing, particularly with respect to the use of off-frame buffers in conjunction with OpenGL. And by challenging, I am speaking in terms of the number of lines of code I must write in order to achieve some objective.

openFrameworks Resources

The main web sites for openFrameworks are:

There are not nearly as many books about openFrameworks as there are about Processing but the two that are most worthwhile are:

If you are searching on Amazon for books about Processing and/or openFrameworks, you may come across the book Programming Interactivity: A Designer’s Guide to Processing, Arduino, and openFrameworks by Joshua Noble. My advise is do not buy this book. It is quite out of date and the source code for the examples never was made available.

Cinder

Cinder is a third creative coding platform and, like openFrameworks, relies on the C++ programming language. I have no personal experience with Cinder but I will say that when I was investigating openFrameworks vs Cinder as a creative coding toolset for the C++ environment, openFrameworks won out.

Cinder Resources

The main Cinder web sites are:

There are even fewer books about Cinder than there are about openFrameworks. Two books you will find on Amazon are:

I hope you’ve found this information useful. I also hope that, even if you are not a digital artist or musician or programmer, you check one or more of these creative coding toolsets because you never know – you just might have a knack for creative coding.

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Fresh Brewed Coffee Digital Art

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

Fresh Brewed Coffee Art
Fresh Brewed Coffee Digital Art

Fresh Brewed Coffee is a digital painting I completed a few days ago. Just as macro photography provides us with extreme close-up views of things, Fresh Brewed Coffee is a work of macro art in that it represents a close-up view of the bubbles on the surface of a freshly brewed cup of coffee. What I particularly like about this macro perspective is that it lends the artwork an abstract appearance. You can click the image above to see an enlarged wallpaper of this art.

Now I’ve been making coffee using a coffee press (aka French press) for years but I had never really "looked" at those bubbles that were floating around on the surface. Perhaps it was the lighting, but it was this one instance of brewing coffee that inspired me to create this particular artwork.

To create the artistic effect I wanted, I did some rewriting of one of my generative art programs. This involved modifying both basic functionality as well as the variety and scope of the parameters associated with the paint brush engine. FYI, what initially inspired me to write my own painting programs was a combination of the limitations of the Adobe Photoshop paint brush engine with a desire to create art that was unique to me – since I do not make my programs commercially available. For those digital artists who are also software savvy, I suggest checking out Processing (Java), openFrameworks (C++), or Cinder (C++).

The version of Fresh Brewed Coffee shown here is the open edition version and is available for purchase online at the following print-on-demand (POD) sites:

Fresh Brewed Coffee artwork on Redbubble

Fresh Brewed Coffee artwork on CRATED

If you are interested in a limited edition framed canvas print, which is 29 by 19 inches when printed at 300ppi, please contact me.

Here’s to starting the day with a good cup of coffee.

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Winners of 2016 NSS Space Settlement Student Art Contest Announced

Friday, April 8th, 2016

Space Settlement Student Art Contest Grand Prize Winner
Space Settlement Student Art Contest Grand Prize Winner
Pioneers of the Cosmos by Adrianna Allen

The National Space Society has announced the winners of its 2016 NSS Space Settlement Student Art Contest. As one of the contest’s art judges, it was once again an interesting experience. While I did not write about my experiences judging last year’s contest, I did write about Judging the 2014 NSS Space Settlement Student Art Contest. As an art contest for students, entries were received from grade levels 5 through college with the vast majority of entries being submitted by non-U.S. students.

A number of entries were disqualified for failing to meet the contest’s few but clearly stated criteria. Unfortunately some of the art disqualified was pretty good. Even worse, there were a few submissions of plagiarized work. For example, taking an existing work of space art and running an edges filter on it does not give an "artist" the right to call it their own art. Worse yet is lying about the process and claiming it to be a drawing by hand.

Aside: As a digital artist who enjoys writing his own image processing and digital art software, one of the self-challenges I used to do quite regularly was analyzing digital art and attempting to figure out exactly how it was created and what software was used. This process helped me to develop my own programs and to have a better feel for the overall digital art creation process.

The judging of the art consisted of two stages. In the first stage, I, Lynne Zielinski (contest manager), and David Brandt-Erichsen (fellow judge) went through the art eliminating those entries that clearly failed to meet the stated criteria regarding size, subject, and content. Once this was done, I created a browsable version of initially valid submissions and distributed that package to the panel of judges (there were six of us judging the art). We had a total of 125 entries to judge with a remarkable 66 coming from 5th graders, the largest grade submission category by far. In contrast, there were only 2 submissions from 6th graders.

It was two weeks ago that all contest judges had a web conference to judge all the accepted entries. It was quite the marathon session with some of the art submitted generating significant discussion. The structure of the art contest’s rules provided us with complete latitude when it came to selecting winning art entries. In fact, we judges were not required to select any entries as winners if we decided that all were of sub-standard quality. Fortunately that was not the case. It was at this stage that we looked more seriously at whether or not the submitted art fully met our subject and content criteria. Unfortunately a large number did not. The most common shortcoming was the failure to show any people in the artwork – as showing people living and working in space was a central theme to the contest.

The easiest part of the entire process was selecting the art to be awarded the Grand Prize. We judges immediately and unanimously chose Pioneers of the Cosmos, a digital painting submitted by Adrianna Allen, as the Grand Prize winner. Adrianna attends Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids, MI.

The judges awarded one First Prize for the submission Space Aviary by Vindya Malla, an 11th grader from India.

There were also three Honorable Mentions awarded. A very well done work of 3D digital art was the piece Micro-Gravity Lunar Orbit Research Center Apollo submitted by Hidayat Saad, a college student from Malaysia. Frankly I thought this artwork to be deserving of a First Prize. The second Honorable Mention went to The Martians submitted by Pranab Kumar Padhi, a 12th grader from India. The artwork depicts a settlement on Mars. What most sold this artwork to the judges was a table of people in the foreground having a meeting. The third and final Honorable Mention went to Shuttle Transport Station (shown below) submitted by Anushka Hebbar, a 9th grader from India. Given Anushka’s wonderful depiction of an O’Neill Colony, this was my second favorite submission to the contest and I thought it should have been awarded a First Prize. So Anushka Hebbar: consider this my personal congratulations to you for your wonderful submission.

Space art contest honorable mention - Shuttle Transport Station
Space art contest honorable mention – Shuttle Transport Station by Anushka Hebbar

A gallery of the winning art and the art submissions that met all the contest’s criteria is now online at Gallery for NSS Roadmap to Space Settlement International Student Art Contest 2016. Enjoy.

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