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Archive for the ‘Algorithmic Art’ Category

Euclidean Chaos Abstract Algorithmic Art

Monday, November 28th, 2016

Euclidean Chaos Abstract Algorithmic Art
Euclidean Chaos Abstract Algorithmic Art

Euclidean Chaos artwork on Redbubble

Euclidean Chaos artwork on CRATED

One of the projects I undertook over the Thanksgiving holidays was to create a new series of abstract algorithmic artworks. The first of these artworks that I’ve made available on Redbubble and Crated is the piece Euclidean Chaos.

The Euclidean in the title is a reference to Euclidean geometry. Euclidean geometry is a mathematical system described by the Greek mathematician Euclid in his textbook on geometry titled simply Elements, written sometime around 300 B.C. The fundamental "space" in Euclidean geometry is the plane. The chaotic aspect of Euclidean Chaos is, what is visually, a countless number of intersecting planes which constitute the artwork.

My analogy for this artwork is the cosmological concept of the multiverse or parallel universes – a system wherein there exists an infinity of non-interacting universes, each unaware of the other’s existence.

I hope you like Euclidean Chaos and will visit its pages on Redbubble and Crated (by clicking the buttons above) to see the variety of art product offerings available for this artwork.

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Computational Synthesis Generative Algorithmic Art

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

Computational Synthesis Generative Algorithmic Art
Computational Synthesis Generative Algorithmic Art

Computational Synthesis is a work of digital art I completed a few days ago which combines elements of algorithmic art and generative art with continual input from the artist. At the time I created this work I had no idea what to title the piece. In creating this artwork, I did have a clear idea visually and aesthetically of what I wanted to create but had given no thought to a title. After completing the piece, I turned to social media. I posted the artwork in a few places and asked for suggestions as to a title. Some suggested titles were:

  • Abstract Structure
  • Digital City
  • Discreet Time
  • Constructor Theory
  • Shifting Perspectives
  • Cityscape, Sky View
  • Aerial View Of Cyberscape
  • Monolith Metastasis
  • Fragmentation

While I did not use any of these titles, I do owe a thanks to the people who suggested them as they served as input to my thought process. Giving a title to a work of art can lead the observer in a certain direction when they are viewing the artwork. In choosing a title, I had to determine how well the title fit with what I was trying to say artistically. And therein lay my chief problem in coming up with a title.

I finally decided on Computational Synthesis as the title. Typically when one thinks of computational creativity, it is more in terms of the "machine" itself being the creator with the source of its creativity being within the framework of its design. In the case of this artwork, the computational component refers to my use of computational methods to produce a particular aesthetic style while synthesis points to the fact that I, the artist, was an equal partner in the creative process.

I created this artwork using an evolved version of a program I created and wrote about in Artistic Creativity and the Evolution of an Idea. For comparison, take a look at a previous artwork I created using an earlier version of this program:

Android Vision Generative Algorithmic Art on Redbubble

Following are links to the open edition version of Computational Synthesis on Redbubble and Crated, as well as a link to my contact page if you are interested in the availability of the limited edition print version of this artwork.

Computational Synthesis artwork on Redbubble

Computational Synthesis artwork on CRATED

Contact Jim Plaxco about Limited Edition Print availability

In closing, the question I ask myself is am I satisfied with the state of the program I used to create this artwork or do I want to continue to explore evolutionary pathways? I have no answer at the moment but ultimately that answer may well depend on whether or not I have a Eureka moment.

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Algorithmic Abstract Art Orientation

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015

Tunnel Vision Algorithmic Abstract Art
Tunnel Vision Algorithmic Abstract Art

Over the last several days I’ve created a number of new works of algorithmic art. One of these pieces is Tunnel Vision – shown above. After creating this particular artwork I began to wonder if the orientation I had used in its creation would actually be the orientation that other people would find to be the most aesthetically appealing. To get an idea of what that answer might be I posted the image below to several art groups and asked people to identify which of the four orientations they found to be the most aesthetically pleasing.

abstract algorithmic art orientation choices
The Four Artwork Orientation Choices

While early voting had A as the overwhelming preference, by the time voting was effectively over, D had emerged as a close runner up. With respect to the two portrait oriented choices, I find it easy to see why D was clearly preferred to C as that’s the choice that I find more aesthetically pleasing. With respect to the two landscape oriented choices, option A was clearly preferred over option B. Again I agree.

Abstract Art Orientation Survey Results
Abstract Art Orientation Survey Results

Taking a step back, you can see in the survey results that there is almost a 50-50 split between people selecting a landscape orientation versus a portrait orientation. So the real challenge is choosing between options A and D with the core question being does this artwork work better as a portrait-oriented artwork or as a landscape-oriented artwork? Given the symmetry of this piece, I think the answer to this question is really one of personal taste.

Creating Tunnel Vision

In creating Tunnel Vision, I was working with a program that is a descendant of a very simple spirograph program I had written for a class I taught on using Processing to create digital spirographs and harmonographs. The image below is an example of the type of output that original spirograph program created.

Original spirograph program output
Original spirograph program output

Over a period of time I gradually enhanced and expanded that program along several separate aesthetic lines of evolution. Tunnel Vision is the result of one of those evolutionary lines.

And My Aesthetic Vote Is…

When I created Tunnel Vision, I did so with the orientation of the canvas corresponding to option A. And it was with that landscape orientation in mind that I modified various parameters to create a work that satisfied my personal aesthetic. Fortunately for me the survey results served as a confirmation of the creative choices I had made.

Open Edition Prints

Open edition prints of Tunnel Vision are available from the following art print sites:

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Blurb vs Lulu to Publish an Art Book

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015

Illustrations for Jim Plaxco's Algorithmic Art Book
Illustrations for my algorithmic art book

Earlier this year I made the decision to publish a book of algorithmic art. Algorithmic art was my introduction to the world of computer art – which is also known as digital art and/or new media art – depending on who you ask.

My first challenge was to decide how the book would be organized. My next challenge was to identify what and how much algorithmic art would be included in the book. My third challenge was to write the supporting text for the book.

The answer to the question of how to organize the book came quite quickly. A general introduction followed by sections which would each feature a particular style of my algorithmic art.

Choosing the art for the book was also fairly straight forward. Given my shortcomings in not taking the time to add newly created art to my web site, I choose 76 algorithmic artworks that I had not published to my web site. In all honesty, for me the satisfaction is in the process of creating art and not in the marketing of art.

The difficult part with respect to selecting art was in dealing with the question of how many pages of illustrations did I want my book to contain. Why? Because the number of pages directly impacts the book’s manufacturing cost and consequently the list price for the buyer.

To answer the question of how many pages it is necessary to take a step back. While I was assembling the book I was also looking in to the question of how I would go about getting the book published. The three options available to me were the traditional publishing route, the traditional self-publishing route, and the newer POD (print-on-demand) electronic publishing route.

For purposes of this discussion, let’s just say that I’ve chosen the electronic POD publishing route. My three finalists in this category were Amazon’s CreateSpace, Blurb, and Lulu. I quickly ruled out CreateSpace as it is not well suited for the publishing of art and/or photography books. That left me with Blurb and Lulu.

Ignoring all other considerations for the moment, I’m going to look only at book production costs. It is the production costs that are going to have the main impact on my book’s affordability. Given that I’ve narrowed my choice of publishers down to Blurb or Lulu, it’s time to look at the base cost of a photo book on each platform.

Impacting cost are size, cover, and paper options. With respect to size and format, my options are:

BLURB Photo Book Sizes
Format Size in Inches
Small Square 7 x 7
Standard Portrait 8 x 10
Standard Landscape 10 x 8
Large Format Landscape 13 x 11
Large Square 12 x 12
LULU Photo Book Sizes
Format Size in Inches
Square 8.5 x 8.5
Landscape 9 x 7
Large Landscape 12.75 x 10.75
Portrait 8.5 x 11

Question: was it a conscious or unconscious decision that led Blurb and Lulu to insure that neither would offer photo books of the same physical dimensions?

Here is where I came to the question of cost. I’m going to accept the default options for each publisher without really knowing whether or not the quality of the two publisher’s defaults are really equal.

From Blurb, I like the large landscape hardback format with a page size of 13 x 11 and 100# paper quality. But look at the book’s base cost by page count!

  • the cost for a 20 page photo book is $69.86
  • the cost for a 60 page photo book is $93.86
  • the cost for a 80 page photo book is $105.86

And since I would like to be able to make some money on the sale of each book, my markup will be an add-on to the base cost. Ouch.

These high manufacturing costs present artists and photographers with a real dilemma. We would like to pack more art and photography into our books in order to provide the buyer with depth and diversity. However, pushing against that is the cost of publication. I would really like to be able to offer a book that is at least 80 pages long but with the cost of such a book being over $100, how many people could afford to buy it?

Taking a look at Lulu, their equivalent book is the 12.75 x 10.75 casewrap hardcover also with 100# paper quality. Pricing for this book would be:

  • the cost for a 20 page photo book is $44.39
  • the cost for a 60 page photo book is $68.39
  • the cost for a 80 page photo book is $80.39

While cheaper than Blurb, it is still not what I deem affordable. If I was willing to downgrade on quality, I could go with Lulu’s 9 x 7 landscape paperback which also has a lower quality paper (80#). If I do that, the costs become:

  • the cost for a 20 page photo book is $12.59
  • the cost for a 60 page photo book is $28.59
  • the cost for a 80 page photo book is $36.59

This is affordable but I’ve also gone with a lower quality book. If I want quality, the only way to get the total cost down is to cut the number of pages in the book. Of course there’s a hidden cost there. Using the Blurb large landscape hardcover as an example, the 20 page version has a total cost of $69.86 but a per page cost of 3.49 – whereas the 80 page version, whose total cost is $105.86, costs only 1.32 per page. So while cutting pages lowers the book’s total cost, it also increases the cost per page – which makes perfect sense if you stop to think about it. And just for perspective, if I show up at the local copy shop and want to make a two-sided color photocopy on generic copier paper, that will cost me over a dollar per page.

These costs demonstrate the basic problem of publishing with electronic PODs – they just don’t have the same economies of scale that you get with traditional publishing and printing. If I went the traditional self-publishing route I could purchase an inventory of books with the equivalent or better quality than my Blurb preference for perhaps 1/10 the cost per book. However that would require that I buy an entire run of books – which means a very large up-front expense on my part. Also, I would then have to take on the added responsibility of distribution – a task I have no expertise at.

So what do to? I’ll provide updates here as I make progress towards reaching a final decision.

Reference Links

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What’s New? Latoocarfians and Talks

Saturday, April 11th, 2015

latoocarfian chaotic function
A Latoocarfian chaotic function

After a long hiatus, I’ve finally published new content to my Artsnova Digital Art Gallery web site. Frankly, I’ve been busy with other projects and updating my Artsnova web site got pushed down the queue. (Note that this blog is actually separate from the web site.) In addition to agreeing to manage the Enterprise in Space Orbiter Design Contest last fall, I undertook an even larger project – designing and launching my own photography web site at Jim Plaxco Photography. Still in my queue of to-do items is converting this blog into a design that is mobile-device friendly – moving up the queue as a consequence of Google’s soon to be updated search ranking algorithm which will push non-mobile-friendly sites further down the search engine results page.

I’ve also been busy working on an algorithmic art book project. To date I have created approximately 40 plus illustrations for the book. My target for the total number of illustrations is in the 60 to 80 range – with the final count depending upon how the extra illustrations will impact the book’s final cost and price. This will be what I hope is the first in a series of books on different forms of computer art.

Two additions I made were two new art presentations: The Beauty of Algorithmic Art and Designing Algorithmic Art: From Concept to Realization. Both of these talks draw heavily on the work I am doing on my algorithmic art book. I will be giving one, possibly both, of these talks at a regional MENSA convention this fall.

I’ve also added a new computer art tutorial – Latoocarfian Chaotic Function Tutorial. This tutorial explains some of the function’s math while providing the source code for a Processing programming language implementation. This is a beginner’s level tutorial and will hopefully encourage someone to more seriously consider this avenue of artistic creation.

In exploring these Latoocarfian chaotic functions I decided to create an expanded variation for the creation of additional art for my book project. One example is A Day In The Life Of A Latoocarfian – so titled as I had the program that was creating this particular artwork run for one full day on a separate dedicated computer.

This week I was also working on an interactive generative painting program which is now basically complete and which I will be writing about in my next blog post.

In closing, I am still collecting input for my digital art and photography newsletter. If you would like to provide input, then please take part in the short, brief survey available at Artsnova Digital Art and Photography Newsletter Survey

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Video: The Liquified Paintings of Claude Monet

Monday, July 7th, 2014

Liquified Paintings of Claude Monet
The Liquified Paintings of Claude Monet Video

Since setting up an account on YouTube towards the end of last year, I confess to not having been active on that platform. I created the account for the purpose of publishing several video portfolios to promote my art. The plan was to create a video for each area of artistic creation I am working in. I created exactly one portfolio video and that was for my portrait art. That was my first attempt at making a video and you can see it here: Portrait Art Video. If you’re interested in the story of how I went about making that video, read Portrait Art Video Project.

The experience of creating that video got me interested in creating some original animations of my own. Since that time I’ve only posted two videos exploring animation. One I dubbed the Swimming Eye Art Video. The other was a crude quickie experiment in animating an image – Sailing A Stormy Sea Video.

For this new video I wanted to create something that would feature the art of the great impressionist painter Claude Monet. I have recently been experimenting with vector fields and their utility as an algorithmic means of creating flowing brush strokes. It occurred to me that I could use this technique to create a series of liquified paintings that would evolve. And that’s how The Liquified Paintings of Claude Monet video was born. And here it is.

The video captures the evolution of six separate paintings and the transition from one to the next. For me it is the transition between paintings that is visually the most interesting. One thing you may have noticed is the very slow evolution of the first painting. It is no coincidence that this first painting is the darkest of the six paintings. You see I tied the speed of evolution to the overall brightness of the image.

Given that these paintings have been "liquified", I deliberately chose artworks by Monet that featured water, be it a pond, a stream, a river, or the ocean. Following are image stills from the video and the name of the Monet painting that was used as the color source at that point during the video.

Claude Monet Impression, Soleil Levant
Claude Monet – Impression, Soleil Levant

Claude Monet The Argenteuil Bridge
Claude Monet – The Argenteuil Bridge

Claude Monet Morning By The Sea
Claude Monet – Morning By The Sea

Claude Monet Autumn On The Seine At Argenteuil
Claude Monet – Autumn On The Seine At Argenteuil

Claude Monet Poplars At The Epte
Claude Monet – Poplars At The Epte

Claude Monet Water Lilies
Claude Monet – Water Lilies

The most time consuming aspect of this project was writing the program that produced the video stills. In all I used 3272 image stills (not counting the title and trailer images) to create this video.

Graphics Software Used

I created this video using several different software packages. The liquified/animated images used to construct the video were created with a program I wrote using the Processing creative coding platform which is a framework built on Java. As a programming language, Processing is easily the best language for non-programmers interested in creative coding projects. To stitch the individual images together into a video, I used the DOS command line utility FFMPEG. To create my title and trailer images I used Adobe Photoshop CS4. Note that my workflow would have consisted entirely of "free" software if I had used GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) to create these two images. For the soundtrack file, I used Audacity to edit the mp3 sound file.The soundtrack music is Laideronnette Imperatrice Des Pagodes by Maurice Ravel. Finally to assemble everything I used Microsoft’s Windows Live Movie Maker which came bundled with Windows 7.

In Conclusion

If you would like to know more about Claude Monet, you may want to read this biography of Claude Monet. If you are of a technical bent, there is this Wikipedia entry for vector fields which served as the painting foundation upon which my Processing program was built. And while I don’t often add new videos, you may want to follow me on YouTube.

I’ll close with a couple of noteworthy quotes.

When you go out to paint, try to forget what objects you have before you – a tree, house, a field….Merely think, here is a little square of blue, here an oblong of pink, here a streak of yellow, and paint it just as it looks to you, the exact color and shape, until it gives your own naive impression of the scene before you. – Claude Monet

A preliminary drawing for a wallpaper pattern is more highly finished than this seascape. – French art critic Louis Leroy in 1874 commenting on Monet’s Impression, Sunrise

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