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Archive for the ‘New Media Art’ Category

Generative Artworks: Hades to Oblivion

Friday, March 24th, 2017

A Cool Day in Hell Generative Art Landscape
A Cool Day in Hell Generative Art Landscape

One of the negatives with respect to digital art is that the concept of an original does not apply as it does with traditional art. With traditional art the original is the physical media to which physical paint has been applied and there will be only one. With digital art the concept of a physical original does not apply because of the nature of digital files, which are basically infinitely reproducible. What has long been viewed as a shortcoming does offer digital artists at least one unique capability.

Because the original artwork is a digital file that can be duplicated, it is possible to use that digital canvas as the foundation for the creation of other derivative artworks. One piece I recently completed is A Cool Day in Hell which had as its original working title Dante’s Inferno.

In creating this artwork, I used one of the generative painting programs I’d designed. The program could be characterized as the Adobe Photoshop Paintbrush Engine on steroids. With one set of parameters, I can entrust the program to do the entire painting by itself. This would be similar to the filter features of Adobe Photoshop or the auto-paint feature of Corel Painter. With another set of parameters, the program functions very much like the paintbrushes in Photoshop and Painter when placed under the artist’s control. The most interesting set of parameters are those that blend program autonomy with some degree of artist interaction. It was this third option that I used to create this particular artwork.

It was only after adding this art to my portfolio on Redbubble that I decided to take that artwork and use it as the starting point for another artwork. I decided to use the same generative painting program that I had used for the original piece. This derivative artwork, titled Passage to Oblivion, does bear a resemblance to the original on which it is based.

Passage to Oblivion Generative Landscape Painting
Passage to Oblivion Generative Landscape Painting

While similar, the two have different color temperatures, textural feel, tone and contrast. Compositionally, the large, open, somewhat mountainous subterranean landscape of A Cool Day in Hell is transformed into a claustrophobic feeling of being inside an eerie underground cave.

To see either of these two artworks on Redbubble, simply click the appropriate image above and the Redbubble page will open in a new tab on your browser. It’s particularly interesting to see how these two artworks look when applied to apparel.

Passage to Oblivion on Redbubble Apparel

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New Landscape Art: Coastal Cliffs At Sunset

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Coastal Cliffs At Sunset Landscape Abstract Art
Coastal Cliffs At Sunset Landscape Abstract Art

Coastal Cliffs At Sunset is my newest work of digital art – which I completed on the Fourth of July. Stylistically I’m not sure how I would categorize this art. Clearly it is not representational art. It’s not really abstract art though it features abstraction. It’s not cubist either though it uses elements of cubism. Nor is it surreal – although in creating this artwork I employed some surrealism.

The creation of this artwork came on the heels of my creation of Stepping Through Time using a new workflow and algorithmic processing technique I developed. In fact the process that I used to create Coastal Cliffs At Sunset is very similar to the process I used to create Stepping Through Time – which you can see on either Redbubble or CRATED.

For background information about this process and workflow, see my article Creating Stepping Through Time Abstract Art, which also discusses pixel sorting, glitch art, and databending.

Currently the open edition version of Coastal Cliffs At Sunset is available for purchase on both Redbubble and CRATED. Follow the links below to see what’s available.

Coastal Cliffs At Sunset Landscape artwork on Redbubble
Coastal Cliffs At Sunset Landscape artwork on CRATED
Contact Jim Plaxco about Limited Edition Print availability


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Computational Synthesis Generative Algorithmic Art

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

Computational Synthesis Generative Algorithmic Art
Computational Synthesis Generative Algorithmic Art

Computational Synthesis is a work of digital art I completed a few days ago which combines elements of algorithmic art and generative art with continual input from the artist. At the time I created this work I had no idea what to title the piece. In creating this artwork, I did have a clear idea visually and aesthetically of what I wanted to create but had given no thought to a title. After completing the piece, I turned to social media. I posted the artwork in a few places and asked for suggestions as to a title. Some suggested titles were:

  • Abstract Structure
  • Digital City
  • Discreet Time
  • Constructor Theory
  • Shifting Perspectives
  • Cityscape, Sky View
  • Aerial View Of Cyberscape
  • Monolith Metastasis
  • Fragmentation

While I did not use any of these titles, I do owe a thanks to the people who suggested them as they served as input to my thought process. Giving a title to a work of art can lead the observer in a certain direction when they are viewing the artwork. In choosing a title, I had to determine how well the title fit with what I was trying to say artistically. And therein lay my chief problem in coming up with a title.

I finally decided on Computational Synthesis as the title. Typically when one thinks of computational creativity, it is more in terms of the "machine" itself being the creator with the source of its creativity being within the framework of its design. In the case of this artwork, the computational component refers to my use of computational methods to produce a particular aesthetic style while synthesis points to the fact that I, the artist, was an equal partner in the creative process.

I created this artwork using an evolved version of a program I created and wrote about in Artistic Creativity and the Evolution of an Idea. For comparison, take a look at a previous artwork I created using an earlier version of this program:

Android Vision Generative Algorithmic Art on Redbubble

Following are links to the open edition version of Computational Synthesis on Redbubble and Crated, as well as a link to my contact page if you are interested in the availability of the limited edition print version of this artwork.

Computational Synthesis artwork on Redbubble

Computational Synthesis artwork on CRATED

Contact Jim Plaxco about Limited Edition Print availability

In closing, the question I ask myself is am I satisfied with the state of the program I used to create this artwork or do I want to continue to explore evolutionary pathways? I have no answer at the moment but ultimately that answer may well depend on whether or not I have a Eureka moment.

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Fresh Brewed Coffee Digital Art

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

Fresh Brewed Coffee Art
Fresh Brewed Coffee Digital Art

Fresh Brewed Coffee is a digital painting I completed a few days ago. Just as macro photography provides us with extreme close-up views of things, Fresh Brewed Coffee is a work of macro art in that it represents a close-up view of the bubbles on the surface of a freshly brewed cup of coffee. What I particularly like about this macro perspective is that it lends the artwork an abstract appearance. You can click the image above to see an enlarged wallpaper of this art.

Now I’ve been making coffee using a coffee press (aka French press) for years but I had never really "looked" at those bubbles that were floating around on the surface. Perhaps it was the lighting, but it was this one instance of brewing coffee that inspired me to create this particular artwork.

To create the artistic effect I wanted, I did some rewriting of one of my generative art programs. This involved modifying both basic functionality as well as the variety and scope of the parameters associated with the paint brush engine. FYI, what initially inspired me to write my own painting programs was a combination of the limitations of the Adobe Photoshop paint brush engine with a desire to create art that was unique to me – since I do not make my programs commercially available. For those digital artists who are also software savvy, I suggest checking out Processing (Java), openFrameworks (C++), or Cinder (C++).

The version of Fresh Brewed Coffee shown here is the open edition version and is available for purchase online at the following print-on-demand (POD) sites:

Fresh Brewed Coffee artwork on Redbubble

Fresh Brewed Coffee artwork on CRATED

If you are interested in a limited edition framed canvas print, which is 29 by 19 inches when printed at 300ppi, please contact me.

Here’s to starting the day with a good cup of coffee.

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Seaside Generative Art Rip-off

Friday, August 14th, 2015

Monet Seaside Rip-off generative art
Monet Seaside Rip-off generative art
Monet Seaside Rip-off on Redbubble

Dare I say that I’ve gotten tired of looking at Mona Lisa, at least the digitized version. Just as the Playboy centerfold photograph of Lenna Söderberg became a standard image used by researchers in the field of image processing and just as the Utah Teapot became something of a standard test object for 3D graphics developers (modeling, lighting, texturing, rendering), images of the Mona Lisa have frequently been used as a test of generative art programs. I myself have created quite a few variations of the Mona Lisa – some of which may eventually see the light of day if I ever decide to make them public. But I thought it high time that I find a new work of art against which to test the generative painting programs which I greatly enjoy creating.

For this latest program I’ve been working on, I decided to make use of a painting by Claude Monet titled Morning by the Sea. This is not the first time I’ve used Monet’s work. Some time ago I created a generative art video composed of paintings by Claude Monet (read about it at The Liquified Paintings of Claude Monet).

From my perspective, with respect to all generative art programs the designer faces the challenge of balance between artist control and program freedom/flexibility. In other words, how tightly or loosely do you want to hold the reins on the program? I view the question of control versus freedom as having two components.

First there is the ability of the artist to interact with the process. An example of a large degree of artist control would be that of a digital artist using an advanced brush in Adobe Photoshop. The Photoshop brush engine has a number of parameters available that make it possible for the artist to design a brush that can vary the way in which digital paint is applied to the canvas depending upon brush speed, pressure, direction. At the other extreme is what I’ll call push-button painting. Again using Photoshop as an example, a photograph can be transformed into a non-photorealistic "painting" by simply applying one or more global filters to the photograph. A favorite exercise of mine is reverse engineering digital art that I see – not only figuring out what commercial software was used, but also determining what process was used.

The second aspect of freedom versus control is that of how the program itself is structured. Think determinism versus chaos. For example, let’s say you have the following set of statements in a program:

int red = 256/2;
int green = 256/3;
int blue = 256/4;
color theColor = color(red,green,blue);

No matter how many times the above statements are executed, the color being created will always be the same color. In other words the system is deterministic. Now consider the following statements:

int red = (x % 255);
int green = (y % 255);
int blue = ( (x+y) % 255);
color theColor = color(red,green,blue);

Even though this code will result in a multitude of colors, it is still deterministic in that for any pair of x,y values, the color generated will always be the same. Lastly, there is this:

int red = random(256);
int green = random(256);
int blue = random(256);
color theColor = color(red,green,blue);

This represents a chaotic alternative where the color created could be anything. There is no control here. Any legal color is just as likely as any other legal color to be created.

These code examples are a gross over-simplification but serve to illustrate the challenge the developer faces. At one extreme everything is a foregone conclusion while at the other extreme it’s anything goes. It is the designer’s challenge to figure out where to put the fulcrum of their generative art system.

The generative painting program used to produce the artwork for this post has not one but two hearts (just like a Time Lord). The first heart is a flowfield object that consists of two separate, internal subsidiary flowfields. You can think of these flowfields as being the physics engines that drive the bristles of the paintbrush. These flowfields serve as forces of control in the system. The second heart is the particle system – which I define as a system of brush bristles, with each bristle having its own characteristics – within limits (again that freedom vs control issue).

For testing the program, I began by creating my own version of Monet’s painting Morning By The Sea using Photoshop. The process was fairly straight forward. The lines of the painting are clear and the visual elements relatively simple. By digitally creating my own version of Monet’s seaside landscape, I am now one step removed from the original. I can also go back and modify the art to see how those modifications affect the generative process.

The next step was to use my version of the painting as the color source for my generative painting program. I must confess that the first several "paintings" I created with the program weren’t satisfactory but with each painting I would go back and modify the system.

Monet original morning by the sea vs generative seaside
left: Original Monet Morning By The Sea, right: generative version created from my modified version of Morning By The Sea

The version shown above is the first painting produced that I am sufficiently happy with to share. On the left is the actual painting and on the right is the version created using my generative painting program, which used as color input my own recreation of Monet’s Morning By The Sea so you could call this a painting of a painting of a painting. I was sufficiently pleased with the results that I decided to make it available on Redbubble.

I plan to continue to work on my program as I’m still not really happy with the brushwork that my brush bristles are producing. A thought came to me last night in bed – that being to broaden the variety of bristles that I’m currently using with a focus being on the beginning and ending of each individual brush stroke. We’ll see what happens.

About the Source Painting


The French painter Oscar-Claude Monet (1840-1926) was one of the founders of Impressionism and created a very large body of work over the course of his life. Monet completed Morning By The Sea in 1881. The image that I used as my reference source is from WikiArt.org and can be found on the WikiArt page for Claude Monet’s painting Morning By The Sea.

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Video: The Liquified Paintings of Claude Monet

Monday, July 7th, 2014

Liquified Paintings of Claude Monet
The Liquified Paintings of Claude Monet Video

Since setting up an account on YouTube towards the end of last year, I confess to not having been active on that platform. I created the account for the purpose of publishing several video portfolios to promote my art. The plan was to create a video for each area of artistic creation I am working in. I created exactly one portfolio video and that was for my portrait art. That was my first attempt at making a video and you can see it here: Portrait Art Video. If you’re interested in the story of how I went about making that video, read Portrait Art Video Project.

The experience of creating that video got me interested in creating some original animations of my own. Since that time I’ve only posted two videos exploring animation. One I dubbed the Swimming Eye Art Video. The other was a crude quickie experiment in animating an image – Sailing A Stormy Sea Video.

For this new video I wanted to create something that would feature the art of the great impressionist painter Claude Monet. I have recently been experimenting with vector fields and their utility as an algorithmic means of creating flowing brush strokes. It occurred to me that I could use this technique to create a series of liquified paintings that would evolve. And that’s how The Liquified Paintings of Claude Monet video was born. And here it is.

The video captures the evolution of six separate paintings and the transition from one to the next. For me it is the transition between paintings that is visually the most interesting. One thing you may have noticed is the very slow evolution of the first painting. It is no coincidence that this first painting is the darkest of the six paintings. You see I tied the speed of evolution to the overall brightness of the image.

Given that these paintings have been "liquified", I deliberately chose artworks by Monet that featured water, be it a pond, a stream, a river, or the ocean. Following are image stills from the video and the name of the Monet painting that was used as the color source at that point during the video.

Claude Monet Impression, Soleil Levant
Claude Monet – Impression, Soleil Levant

Claude Monet The Argenteuil Bridge
Claude Monet – The Argenteuil Bridge

Claude Monet Morning By The Sea
Claude Monet – Morning By The Sea

Claude Monet Autumn On The Seine At Argenteuil
Claude Monet – Autumn On The Seine At Argenteuil

Claude Monet Poplars At The Epte
Claude Monet – Poplars At The Epte

Claude Monet Water Lilies
Claude Monet – Water Lilies

The most time consuming aspect of this project was writing the program that produced the video stills. In all I used 3272 image stills (not counting the title and trailer images) to create this video.

Graphics Software Used

I created this video using several different software packages. The liquified/animated images used to construct the video were created with a program I wrote using the Processing creative coding platform which is a framework built on Java. As a programming language, Processing is easily the best language for non-programmers interested in creative coding projects. To stitch the individual images together into a video, I used the DOS command line utility FFMPEG. To create my title and trailer images I used Adobe Photoshop CS4. Note that my workflow would have consisted entirely of "free" software if I had used GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) to create these two images. For the soundtrack file, I used Audacity to edit the mp3 sound file.The soundtrack music is Laideronnette Imperatrice Des Pagodes by Maurice Ravel. Finally to assemble everything I used Microsoft’s Windows Live Movie Maker which came bundled with Windows 7.

In Conclusion

If you would like to know more about Claude Monet, you may want to read this biography of Claude Monet. If you are of a technical bent, there is this Wikipedia entry for vector fields which served as the painting foundation upon which my Processing program was built. And while I don’t often add new videos, you may want to follow me on YouTube.

I’ll close with a couple of noteworthy quotes.

When you go out to paint, try to forget what objects you have before you – a tree, house, a field….Merely think, here is a little square of blue, here an oblong of pink, here a streak of yellow, and paint it just as it looks to you, the exact color and shape, until it gives your own naive impression of the scene before you. – Claude Monet

A preliminary drawing for a wallpaper pattern is more highly finished than this seascape. – French art critic Louis Leroy in 1874 commenting on Monet’s Impression, Sunrise

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