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Posts Tagged ‘art’

Pierre-Auguste Renoir The Umbrellas Algorithmic Interpretation Video

Saturday, December 2nd, 2017

Pierre-Auguste Renoir The Umbrellas Algorithmic Interpretation Video
Pierre-Auguste Renoir The Umbrellas Algorithmic Interpretation Video

I just created a video for the first time in quite a while for my YouTube account. It came about when I was experimenting with algorithmic representations of a source image using the Processing programming language. The image I happened to be working with was “The Umbrellas”, a painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

As I worked with variations on the algorithm it struck me that an animation could be interesting. The basics of the algorithm were to first create a grid of equally spaced points and assign each a x,y location. The key variable at this point was the amount of spacing there would be between each x,y grid location. For this video I set the grid spacing to be 10 pixels.

Next was to get the color value from Renoir’s “The Umbrellas” image for each of the x,y locations in the grid. To draw I had decided to use the line() function. The variables for each line would be color, starting angle, and length. For the line’s color, I simply used the color value taken from the image for that location. For the starting angle of rotation, I opted to use the hue taken from the corresponding pixel. To get the hue required converting the RGB color value into its HSB (hue, saturation, brightness) equivalent. The length of the each line being drawn was determined by the brightness of the pixel at that location. This resulted in another variable: establishing what the maximum line length would be. So brightness values of 0 to 255 had to be translated into a range of lengths from some minimum value to some maximum value. The standard way of doing this in Processing is to use the map() function. I never use map() because it is an inefficient way to translate numbers from one scale into another scale. For the video, I simply divided the pixel brightness by 12 – meaning the longest a line could be was 21 pixels.

To add some variability, I added a variable for the Z axis and used a Perlin noise field to control each location’s Z coordinate. The result is that the distance of each line from the camera varies somewhat, which enhances the perception of depth in the image.

To animate the image required changing one or more of the variables associated with each grid point over time. Keeping things simple, I added a global variable that would equally increment each line’s rotation angle between frames. This created a uniform rotation for all the lines.

I then added a time variable to alter the Perlin noise field values over time and updated each line’s Z coordinate between frames. The main issue here was with respect to how much I wanted the range of Z values to vary. For comparison, below is an illustration of what you would see if a substantially greater range of Z coordinate values was allowed.

Pierre Auguste Renoir The Umbrellas Algorithmic Interpretation Video Variation
Pierre Auguste Renoir The Umbrellas Algorithmic Interpretation Video Variation

To create the output, I used the Processing saveFrame() feature to write each frame of the movie to a tiff file. Separately I had used Audacity to create a narration soundtrack for the video. Once I knew how long my audio track was, I simply dropped a variable into my Processing program which indicated the frameCount at which to stop generating image frames.

While I have previously used tools like FFMPEG to create videos, this time I decided to use Processing’s Movie Maker tool. Confirming that my tiff and mp3 files were fine, I started up Movie Maker. I specified the input sources for my files, went with the default compression of animation and clicked the “Create Movie” button. I then monitored the dialog window as the program progressed through the 3000 images used to create the video. The program ended without error.

But when I went to view the video using VLC, all I got was a black screen and horribly garbled and spotty audio. I had no idea what had gone wrong. Rather than resorting to one of my other tools, I opted to give Movie Maker another try. The only difference was that this time I selected the JPEG option for compression. The dialog proceeded as before and again ended without error. This time the video and audio were fine, except for a narrow strip of color along the video’s edge. For purposes of this video, that is something I can live with.

Unfortunately the image quality of the video has suffered due to YouTube’s overly enthusiastic image compression. Whereas my original video upload was a 3.1 gigabyte file, YouTube compressed it down to a mere 29 megabytes (you can’t throw away that much information without losing quality). While I do understand the need to economize on bandwidth, such economies can be achieved in part by viewing the video at one of the lower resolution settings.

You can view the video on YouTube at: https://youtu.be/CNE0j1LXIJ0. Give the video a watch, let me know what you think, and share it if you like it.

 

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Juno Perijove 8 View of Jupiter Generative Space Art

Monday, September 25th, 2017

Juno Perijove 8 View of Jupiter Generative Art
Juno Perijove 8 View of Jupiter Generative Space Art,
50 by 30 inches printed on metal

Recently I got back in to working with images of Jupiter taken by the Junocam camera on the NASA Juno mission to Jupiter. Most of the time I’ve spent was in the early phase of the mission as I attempted to come up with a work flow that would allow me to effectively process the raw images that were being made available to the public. My tool set consisted of Rawtherapee, Adobe Photoshop CS4, and a couple of Processing programs I had written. I also experimented with using some other software tools. You can read about my initial adventures in Image Processing and the Juno JunoCam. Once I had come up with a reasonable work flow my interest waned and other projects percolated up the to the top of my task list.

Cassini’s plunge into Saturn a week ago led me to revisit the Junocam web site. Finding an appealing image from the perijove 8 sequence of images, I downloaded it and ran it through my work flow. Pleased with the results, I submitted it to the Image Processing section of the Junocam site.

Image processed version of Junocam Perijove 8 image of Jupiter, imageid=JNCE-2017244-08C00123-V01
Image processed version of Junocam Perijove 8 image of Jupiter, imageid=JNCE-2017244-08C00123-V01

You will find the above image on the Junocam web site at Junocam Perijove 8 Poi: Phantom Image Processing

No sooner had I finished work on the above image than the thought hit me to create a generative painting of the image. I really was taken by the colors and complex patterns of the Jovian atmosphere and felt that it would make a wonderful subject.

The first decision I had to make was with respect to which of my generative painting programs I would use. I decided on using a program that I’ve been actively modding (aka incremental development) over the last year – with each modification adding some new category of functionality.

In creating the painted version of the image of Jupiter, my principal artistic challenge was deciding whether to have a starry sky as a background or to simply go with a flat black background. For my aesthetic tastes for this particular image, I decided to go with a simple flat black background.

Another artistic decision was to figure out whether or not I wanted to soften Jupiter’s limb. Did I want Jupiter to be hard edged or soft edged? In this case, I opted for the soft edged approach.

The last decision was how much negative space to provide. For those not familiar with negative space, it is simply the space that surrounds the object in the image. Consider as an analogy the concept of white space – the amount of empty space that separates content elements on a web page. In this case it was a question of did I want Jupiter to fill the entire canvas or did I want it to fill only a fraction of the canvas. Experimenting with different ratios of width to height and sizes I ultimately decided on what you see above. One of the things about the artwork is that due to the abstract nature of the Jovian atmosphere, you can pretty much hang the painting at any orientation.

For details about the artwork, which is 50 by 30 inches, see the art gallery page for Juno Perijove 8 View of Jupiter

I have also made a cropped and downsized version of the artwork available on a variety of products in my Redbubble gallery: Jupiter On Juno Perijove 8 artwork on Redbubble

Jupiter On Juno Perijove 8 artwork on Redbubble

Jupiter Coffee Cup
Jupiter on a Coffee Cup

My vote for the most artistic planet in the solar system definitely goes to Jupiter.

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Ad Blockers and My Art Title Generator

Saturday, July 15th, 2017

Automatic Art Title Generator

A few days ago I added an Art Title Generator to my web site. I did so as a consequence of having writer’s block on coming up with a title for a generative artwork I had created at the beginning of the week. I wrote the Python program for the generator using word dictionaries I had created for a Haiku generator I had written using Java. I added it to my web site and promoted it via some of my social media accounts.

I was surprised when I heard from a couple of people who said that it was not working. Surprised because this is a Python program running on the server and delivering to the user a complete web page with the generated artwork title clearly visible. I couldn’t imagine why these folks were not seeing the title – but were seeing the rest of the generated page.

Impossible.

I went to my son’s computer and used his browser (Chrome) to view the page. And what I saw was no title. It just wasn’t there – which was impossible. I did a view source to take a look at the code that was received by his browser – and the title was there – right where it was supposed to be. So why wasn’t it visible?

And why did the art title display in my Chrome browser but not my son’s? Then it occurred to me. I asked my son if he was using an ad blocker. He said yes. Looking at my CSS, I had used a CSS class that I had named "contentad" and used it to display quotations about art at the bottom of quite a few of my web pages. The only explanation for the invisibility of the generated art titles was that an ad blocker was looking at the name of the CSS class and saying to itself "oh, this is an advertisement so I’ll hide it from the viewer."

To test my theory, I renamed the CSS class and then updated the 102 html files on my site that used it – as well as the Python program. I went back to my son’s browser and voila – there was the art title in full view – no longer hidden by the ad blocker plugin.

To read more about my art title generator and generate a title for yourself, you can proceed to the introductory page Automatic Art Title Generator. Or if you are the impatient sort and want to see an art title right now, load the Art Title Generator.

Here’s hoping that you enjoy the algorithmically generated artwork titles.

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Generative Artworks: Hades to Oblivion

Friday, March 24th, 2017

A Cool Day in Hell Generative Art Landscape
A Cool Day in Hell Generative Art Landscape

One of the negatives with respect to digital art is that the concept of an original does not apply as it does with traditional art. With traditional art the original is the physical media to which physical paint has been applied and there will be only one. With digital art the concept of a physical original does not apply because of the nature of digital files, which are basically infinitely reproducible. What has long been viewed as a shortcoming does offer digital artists at least one unique capability.

Because the original artwork is a digital file that can be duplicated, it is possible to use that digital canvas as the foundation for the creation of other derivative artworks. One piece I recently completed is A Cool Day in Hell which had as its original working title Dante’s Inferno.

In creating this artwork, I used one of the generative painting programs I’d designed. The program could be characterized as the Adobe Photoshop Paintbrush Engine on steroids. With one set of parameters, I can entrust the program to do the entire painting by itself. This would be similar to the filter features of Adobe Photoshop or the auto-paint feature of Corel Painter. With another set of parameters, the program functions very much like the paintbrushes in Photoshop and Painter when placed under the artist’s control. The most interesting set of parameters are those that blend program autonomy with some degree of artist interaction. It was this third option that I used to create this particular artwork.

It was only after adding this art to my portfolio on Redbubble that I decided to take that artwork and use it as the starting point for another artwork. I decided to use the same generative painting program that I had used for the original piece. This derivative artwork, titled Passage to Oblivion, does bear a resemblance to the original on which it is based.

Passage to Oblivion Generative Landscape Painting
Passage to Oblivion Generative Landscape Painting

While similar, the two have different color temperatures, textural feel, tone and contrast. Compositionally, the large, open, somewhat mountainous subterranean landscape of A Cool Day in Hell is transformed into a claustrophobic feeling of being inside an eerie underground cave.

To see either of these two artworks on Redbubble, simply click the appropriate image above and the Redbubble page will open in a new tab on your browser. It’s particularly interesting to see how these two artworks look when applied to apparel.

Passage to Oblivion on Redbubble Apparel

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SEA (Self Employment in the Arts) conference

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

SEA Self Employment in the Arts conference 2017
SEA Self Employment in the Arts conference 2017

This weekend I will be both attending and participating in programming at the SEA (Self Employment in the Arts) conference for artists which is being held at the Hilton Hotel in Lisle, Illinois. The first SEA Conference was held at Columbia College in Chicago in 2000 and has been growing since then. The conference is currently hosted by North Central College, Naperville IL.

The focus of the SEA conference is on helping artists, particularly emerging visual, performing, literary, and media artists, succeed by providing relevant programming as well as providing networking opportunities. With more than 60 speakers, the lineup of programs, presentations, panels, roundtable discussions, workshops, and one-on-one mentoring is really impressive. And yes, portfolio reviews are a part of the conference.

For students, the conference also features the SEA Juried College Art Competition, which is open to all college students. There is also an Idea Pitch Competition open to those students who either have a creative business or an idea for one. The Idea Pitch Competition has over $3,000 in prizes for competition winners.

There are multiple parallel programming tracks with the track blocks divided into sessions based on time. The good news is that with the number of concurrent programs going on, attendees will have no problem identifying a program they want to attend. The bad news is that there will be many times when there are two or more programs you want to attend and will be forced to choose just one.

The presentation I’m leaning towards attending during Session 1 is The Art of Networking by Brandy Sales where she shares her insights into networking and how those insights have helped her art business.

During Session 2 I would have loved to attend the workshop LICENSING KNOW-HOW – Creating Profits from Art + Design as that is an area I would like to learn more about. Unfortunately I will be a panelist on the Marketing your Creative Talent or Business panel which is at the same time. The panel consists of Larry Brown, Lauren Ramsey, Jessica Segal, and myself. Our discussion will be addressing the various marketing strategies that we have used and the role changing technology plays in marketing. For my part, my area of expertise is in the online aspects – although I hope to have the opportunity to comment on some other devices that have worked for me.

During Session 3 I’m looking forward to attending the panel Which Way to Go: Paths to Publication which addresses the multiple issues associated with getting your book published. This is very relevant for me since I have not one but two books in the works. In fact the first book, which is a portfolio of my algorithmic art, is largely done – and has been for some time. However, identifying who and how to publish the book has been a stumbling block. I initially thought I would go with Blurb or Lulu but quickly came to the conclusion that those options, though the easiest, were not the best. This session will be led by Jennifer McCord and Robin Strachan and I look forward to peppering them with questions.

Friday’s conference dinner will feature a keynote address by Tom Varano whose topic is Live Life with Passion.

Session 4 begins after dinner and is sponsored by Illinois State University. This session consists of a total of 17 roundtables for artists to choose from. Subjects of interest to me include publishing, crowdfunding, social media, and artist management. Unfortunately I’ll be missing them since I will be leading the roundtable discussion on SEO (Search Engine Optimization) – an increasingly important aspect of being "found" online.

Friday evening concludes with a variety of entertainment choices for the attendees. A drum circle, dancing, and comedy are all attractive options but not as appealing to me as the Electroskip demonstration which features dancers wearing motion sensors used to generate sound. Wearable computing and interactive digital art have long been a subject of interest to me and I have previously given presentations that have the audience creating art on-screen via their vocalizations.

Saturday starts early with an 8:00am breakfast and is followed by Session 5. I would have liked to attend the Selling Yourself and Your Art panel discussion. For many artists, myself included, selling (marketing, the act of talking up, etc.) our art can be a challenge – not that we don’t know what to say or how to do it but considered from the emotional angle that turns the artist from creator into something of a used car salesman – if you get my meaning. Leading this session is Dr. Sean Flanigan from Colorado Mesa University.

Unfortunately I won’t be able to attend that session since I’ve been slated to provide one-on-one consulting during that time. People sign up for the opportunity to ask me questions about web design, technical writing, HTML, SEO, and digital photography.

For Session 6, I am undecided on whether to attend Gallery Chat or Trademark. Gallery Chat is a workshop led by Chris Cosnowski that teaches artists how to improve their odds of getting accepted into juried art competitions. Trademark looks at the risks and legal issues associated with trademark law and is led by Elizabeth Russell and Russell Law.

The keynote address for the luncheon is by Gene Weygandt whose topic is Go into the Arts, I’m not kidding.

For Session 7 I would have loved to attend the Freelance in the Visual Arts panel discussion featuring Catherine Borzym, Elaine Luther, John McDavitt, and Tim Plum. The panel is slated to address legal issues, getting your first client, building your client base, and other related issues. For my part I’ll be leading a roundtable discussion on Print on Demand (POD). Specifically I’ll be looking at issues associated with platforms, commissions, marketing, and the steps involved in evaluating the many print on demand offerings available.

I’ll close with a quotation from Pablo Picasso that is prominently displayed on the 2017 SEA Self Employment in the Arts conference web site: "Action is the foundational key to all success." So what are you waiting for?

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Euclidean Chaos Abstract Algorithmic Art

Monday, November 28th, 2016

Euclidean Chaos Abstract Algorithmic Art
Euclidean Chaos Abstract Algorithmic Art

Euclidean Chaos artwork on Redbubble

Euclidean Chaos artwork on CRATED

One of the projects I undertook over the Thanksgiving holidays was to create a new series of abstract algorithmic artworks. The first of these artworks that I’ve made available on Redbubble and Crated is the piece Euclidean Chaos.

The Euclidean in the title is a reference to Euclidean geometry. Euclidean geometry is a mathematical system described by the Greek mathematician Euclid in his textbook on geometry titled simply Elements, written sometime around 300 B.C. The fundamental "space" in Euclidean geometry is the plane. The chaotic aspect of Euclidean Chaos is, what is visually, a countless number of intersecting planes which constitute the artwork.

My analogy for this artwork is the cosmological concept of the multiverse or parallel universes – a system wherein there exists an infinity of non-interacting universes, each unaware of the other’s existence.

I hope you like Euclidean Chaos and will visit its pages on Redbubble and Crated (by clicking the buttons above) to see the variety of art product offerings available for this artwork.

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