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Archive for the ‘New Media Art’ Category

Orbital Decay Interactive Algorithmic Art

Tuesday, January 30th, 2018

Orbital Decay Interactive Algorithmic Art
Orbital Decay Interactive Algorithmic Art on Redbubble

Orbital Decay is a work of algorithmic art I created last night and is 25 by 25 inches when printed at 300ppi (pixels per inch). To create this art I used an interactive algorithmic art program I finished writing yesterday. Traditionally algorithmic art was defined as art created by a largely deterministic, algorithmic process using parameters to control the process. Complicating the matter of categorization has been the introduction of that category of digital art known as generative art – which has substantial overlap with the algorithmic art category with respect to how the art is created from a computational perspective. In fact it has been argued that algorithmic art is a subset of generative art – even though the former precedes the later. Wikipedia has this to say on the subject:

Algorithmic art, also known as computer-generated art, is a subset of generative art (generated by an autonomous system) and is related to systems art (influenced by systems theory). Fractal art is an example of algorithmic art. Source: Wikipedia entry for algorithmic art

Why Algorithmic and not Generative?

So why have I categorized Orbital Decay as a work of interactive algorithmic art and not as a work of generative art? That’s a good question because this work does qualify as a work of generative art. However as I am the artist I get to decide what I want to call it – although I could argue that to label this art as generative would be equally appropriate.

You will note I have added the qualifier interactive to the algorithmic label. I did this because the creation of this artwork did require direct interaction from me. Unlike traditional algorithmic art programs which can be driven entirely by parameters and parametric settings (an autonomous system), this program as written could not create anything without the artist’s direct input throughout the creation process.

Orbital Decay is available as wall art and as illustration on a variety of products offered by Redbubble. Clicking either the link button or the image below will take you to the Orbital Decay Redbubble product page.

Orbital Decay Interactive Algorithmic Art on Redbubble

Orbital Decay Art on Womens Tee Shirts
Orbital Decay Art on Women’s Tee Shirts

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir The Umbrellas Algorithmic Interpretation Video

Saturday, December 2nd, 2017

Pierre-Auguste Renoir The Umbrellas Algorithmic Interpretation Video
Pierre-Auguste Renoir The Umbrellas Algorithmic Interpretation Video

I just created a video for the first time in quite a while for my YouTube account. It came about when I was experimenting with algorithmic representations of a source image using the Processing programming language. The image I happened to be working with was “The Umbrellas”, a painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

As I worked with variations on the algorithm it struck me that an animation could be interesting. The basics of the algorithm were to first create a grid of equally spaced points and assign each a x,y location. The key variable at this point was the amount of spacing there would be between each x,y grid location. For this video I set the grid spacing to be 10 pixels.

Next was to get the color value from Renoir’s “The Umbrellas” image for each of the x,y locations in the grid. To draw I had decided to use the line() function. The variables for each line would be color, starting angle, and length. For the line’s color, I simply used the color value taken from the image for that location. For the starting angle of rotation, I opted to use the hue taken from the corresponding pixel. To get the hue required converting the RGB color value into its HSB (hue, saturation, brightness) equivalent. The length of the each line being drawn was determined by the brightness of the pixel at that location. This resulted in another variable: establishing what the maximum line length would be. So brightness values of 0 to 255 had to be translated into a range of lengths from some minimum value to some maximum value. The standard way of doing this in Processing is to use the map() function. I never use map() because it is an inefficient way to translate numbers from one scale into another scale. For the video, I simply divided the pixel brightness by 12 – meaning the longest a line could be was 21 pixels.

To add some variability, I added a variable for the Z axis and used a Perlin noise field to control each location’s Z coordinate. The result is that the distance of each line from the camera varies somewhat, which enhances the perception of depth in the image.

To animate the image required changing one or more of the variables associated with each grid point over time. Keeping things simple, I added a global variable that would equally increment each line’s rotation angle between frames. This created a uniform rotation for all the lines.

I then added a time variable to alter the Perlin noise field values over time and updated each line’s Z coordinate between frames. The main issue here was with respect to how much I wanted the range of Z values to vary. For comparison, below is an illustration of what you would see if a substantially greater range of Z coordinate values was allowed.

Pierre Auguste Renoir The Umbrellas Algorithmic Interpretation Video Variation
Pierre Auguste Renoir The Umbrellas Algorithmic Interpretation Video Variation

To create the output, I used the Processing saveFrame() feature to write each frame of the movie to a tiff file. Separately I had used Audacity to create a narration soundtrack for the video. Once I knew how long my audio track was, I simply dropped a variable into my Processing program which indicated the frameCount at which to stop generating image frames.

While I have previously used tools like FFMPEG to create videos, this time I decided to use Processing’s Movie Maker tool. Confirming that my tiff and mp3 files were fine, I started up Movie Maker. I specified the input sources for my files, went with the default compression of animation and clicked the “Create Movie” button. I then monitored the dialog window as the program progressed through the 3000 images used to create the video. The program ended without error.

But when I went to view the video using VLC, all I got was a black screen and horribly garbled and spotty audio. I had no idea what had gone wrong. Rather than resorting to one of my other tools, I opted to give Movie Maker another try. The only difference was that this time I selected the JPEG option for compression. The dialog proceeded as before and again ended without error. This time the video and audio were fine, except for a narrow strip of color along the video’s edge. For purposes of this video, that is something I can live with.

Unfortunately the image quality of the video has suffered due to YouTube’s overly enthusiastic image compression. Whereas my original video upload was a 3.1 gigabyte file, YouTube compressed it down to a mere 29 megabytes (you can’t throw away that much information without losing quality). While I do understand the need to economize on bandwidth, such economies can be achieved in part by viewing the video at one of the lower resolution settings.

You can view the video on YouTube at: https://youtu.be/CNE0j1LXIJ0. Give the video a watch, let me know what you think, and share it if you like it.

 

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Generative Artworks: Hades to Oblivion

Friday, March 24th, 2017

A Cool Day in Hell Generative Art Landscape
A Cool Day in Hell Generative Art Landscape

One of the negatives with respect to digital art is that the concept of an original does not apply as it does with traditional art. With traditional art the original is the physical media to which physical paint has been applied and there will be only one. With digital art the concept of a physical original does not apply because of the nature of digital files, which are basically infinitely reproducible. What has long been viewed as a shortcoming does offer digital artists at least one unique capability.

Because the original artwork is a digital file that can be duplicated, it is possible to use that digital canvas as the foundation for the creation of other derivative artworks. One piece I recently completed is A Cool Day in Hell which had as its original working title Dante’s Inferno.

In creating this artwork, I used one of the generative painting programs I’d designed. The program could be characterized as the Adobe Photoshop Paintbrush Engine on steroids. With one set of parameters, I can entrust the program to do the entire painting by itself. This would be similar to the filter features of Adobe Photoshop or the auto-paint feature of Corel Painter. With another set of parameters, the program functions very much like the paintbrushes in Photoshop and Painter when placed under the artist’s control. The most interesting set of parameters are those that blend program autonomy with some degree of artist interaction. It was this third option that I used to create this particular artwork.

It was only after adding this art to my portfolio on Redbubble that I decided to take that artwork and use it as the starting point for another artwork. I decided to use the same generative painting program that I had used for the original piece. This derivative artwork, titled Passage to Oblivion, does bear a resemblance to the original on which it is based.

Passage to Oblivion Generative Landscape Painting
Passage to Oblivion Generative Landscape Painting

While similar, the two have different color temperatures, textural feel, tone and contrast. Compositionally, the large, open, somewhat mountainous subterranean landscape of A Cool Day in Hell is transformed into a claustrophobic feeling of being inside an eerie underground cave.

To see either of these two artworks on Redbubble, simply click the appropriate image above and the Redbubble page will open in a new tab on your browser. It’s particularly interesting to see how these two artworks look when applied to apparel.

Passage to Oblivion on Redbubble Apparel

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New Landscape Art: Coastal Cliffs At Sunset

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

Coastal Cliffs At Sunset Landscape Abstract Art
Coastal Cliffs At Sunset Landscape Abstract Art

Coastal Cliffs At Sunset is my newest work of digital art – which I completed on the Fourth of July. Stylistically I’m not sure how I would categorize this art. Clearly it is not representational art. It’s not really abstract art though it features abstraction. It’s not cubist either though it uses elements of cubism. Nor is it surreal – although in creating this artwork I employed some surrealism.

The creation of this artwork came on the heels of my creation of Stepping Through Time using a new workflow and algorithmic processing technique I developed. In fact the process that I used to create Coastal Cliffs At Sunset is very similar to the process I used to create Stepping Through Time – which you can see on either Redbubble or CRATED.

For background information about this process and workflow, see my article Creating Stepping Through Time Abstract Art, which also discusses pixel sorting, glitch art, and databending.

Currently the open edition version of Coastal Cliffs At Sunset is available for purchase on both Redbubble and CRATED. Follow the links below to see what’s available.

Coastal Cliffs At Sunset Landscape artwork on Redbubble
Coastal Cliffs At Sunset Landscape artwork on CRATED
Contact Jim Plaxco about Limited Edition Print availability


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Computational Synthesis Generative Algorithmic Art

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

Computational Synthesis Generative Algorithmic Art
Computational Synthesis Generative Algorithmic Art

Computational Synthesis is a work of digital art I completed a few days ago which combines elements of algorithmic art and generative art with continual input from the artist. At the time I created this work I had no idea what to title the piece. In creating this artwork, I did have a clear idea visually and aesthetically of what I wanted to create but had given no thought to a title. After completing the piece, I turned to social media. I posted the artwork in a few places and asked for suggestions as to a title. Some suggested titles were:

  • Abstract Structure
  • Digital City
  • Discreet Time
  • Constructor Theory
  • Shifting Perspectives
  • Cityscape, Sky View
  • Aerial View Of Cyberscape
  • Monolith Metastasis
  • Fragmentation

While I did not use any of these titles, I do owe a thanks to the people who suggested them as they served as input to my thought process. Giving a title to a work of art can lead the observer in a certain direction when they are viewing the artwork. In choosing a title, I had to determine how well the title fit with what I was trying to say artistically. And therein lay my chief problem in coming up with a title.

I finally decided on Computational Synthesis as the title. Typically when one thinks of computational creativity, it is more in terms of the "machine" itself being the creator with the source of its creativity being within the framework of its design. In the case of this artwork, the computational component refers to my use of computational methods to produce a particular aesthetic style while synthesis points to the fact that I, the artist, was an equal partner in the creative process.

I created this artwork using an evolved version of a program I created and wrote about in Artistic Creativity and the Evolution of an Idea. For comparison, take a look at a previous artwork I created using an earlier version of this program:

Android Vision Generative Algorithmic Art on Redbubble

Following are links to the open edition version of Computational Synthesis on Redbubble and Crated, as well as a link to my contact page if you are interested in the availability of the limited edition print version of this artwork.

Computational Synthesis artwork on Redbubble

Computational Synthesis artwork on CRATED

Contact Jim Plaxco about Limited Edition Print availability

In closing, the question I ask myself is am I satisfied with the state of the program I used to create this artwork or do I want to continue to explore evolutionary pathways? I have no answer at the moment but ultimately that answer may well depend on whether or not I have a Eureka moment.

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Fresh Brewed Coffee Digital Art

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

Fresh Brewed Coffee Art
Fresh Brewed Coffee Digital Art

Fresh Brewed Coffee is a digital painting I completed a few days ago. Just as macro photography provides us with extreme close-up views of things, Fresh Brewed Coffee is a work of macro art in that it represents a close-up view of the bubbles on the surface of a freshly brewed cup of coffee. What I particularly like about this macro perspective is that it lends the artwork an abstract appearance. You can click the image above to see an enlarged wallpaper of this art.

Now I’ve been making coffee using a coffee press (aka French press) for years but I had never really "looked" at those bubbles that were floating around on the surface. Perhaps it was the lighting, but it was this one instance of brewing coffee that inspired me to create this particular artwork.

To create the artistic effect I wanted, I did some rewriting of one of my generative art programs. This involved modifying both basic functionality as well as the variety and scope of the parameters associated with the paint brush engine. FYI, what initially inspired me to write my own painting programs was a combination of the limitations of the Adobe Photoshop paint brush engine with a desire to create art that was unique to me – since I do not make my programs commercially available. For those digital artists who are also software savvy, I suggest checking out Processing (Java), openFrameworks (C++), or Cinder (C++).

The version of Fresh Brewed Coffee shown here is the open edition version and is available for purchase online at the following print-on-demand (POD) sites:

Fresh Brewed Coffee artwork on Redbubble

Fresh Brewed Coffee artwork on CRATED

If you are interested in a limited edition framed canvas print, which is 29 by 19 inches when printed at 300ppi, please contact me.

Here’s to starting the day with a good cup of coffee.

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